FermCalc Winemaking Calculator

What is FermCalc?

FermCalc is a collection of advanced winemaking calculators designed to assist both amateur and professional winemakers with calculations related to the following activities:

new Click here for a summary of the new features in FermCalc.

Running FermCalc

There are three different versions of FermCalc:

  1. A Java version that can be run two different ways:
    1. As an online calculator that runs as a Java Applet inside your browser window.
    2. As a stand-alone calculator that you can download and install on your computer.
  2. A JavaScript version designed for mobile devices that don't run Java.
  3. An Android version available in the Google Play and Amazon app stores.
Get it on Google Play    Available at Amazon

All versions include identical functionality and mathematics.

To run the Java version, you'll need to install the Java Virtual Machine.  You can download and install it by clicking on the Java button below.  The JavaScript calculator does not require installation of the Java Virtual Machine.

Java - Get It Now!

The Java and JavaScript versions of FermCalc have been tested with the following browsers:

By using FermCalc, you agree to the all of the terms of the FermCalc License Agreement.

Making a Calculation

To get started, go to the Settings menu to set your preferred unit system and default temperatures.

To perform a calculation with any of the calculators, follow these three general steps:

  1. Select options – Select the appropriate options from the available radio-button lists or drop-down lists.
  2. Select units – Make any desired changes to the unit selections for each of the input and output fields. When the unit selections are changed, the values in the field are changed to reflect the new unit selection.
  3. Enter values – Enter the required values in the input fields.

Calculated values will appear in the output fields when the necessary input data are provided.  Errors will be flagged with a red error message down below the calculator.  Negative values will generally be ignored (assumed to be zero) except for certain specific gravity, temperature, and refractivity units.

© 2007-2017 Steve Gross
Last updated 01 January 2017.